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RCO





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Location: Ontario

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2018 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( another drug arrest in small town Ontario , this one in sleepy Bracebridge . you know something is up when someone from " etobicoke " decides to rent a hotel room 2 hours north of the city for no reason other than to sell drugs cause there worth more in the north than the city .

but the question is did he really just come north on his own ? or did someone direct him to do so ? Is he part of a bigger organization ? )



Bracebridge OPP Take $26,000 In Drugs And Cash Off The Streets


By Muskoka411 Staff -
December 15, 2018 10:53 am



On December 14, 2018 the Bracebridge OPP Community Street Crime Unit conducted an investigation which led to a traffic stop. During this traffic stop a male was arrested for possession of a controlled substance for the purpose of trafficking. As a result, a search warrant was executed on his hotel room and a large quantity of cocaine and heroin/fentanyl mix was located.

In the early hours of December 15, 2018 a search warrant was executed which resulted in the seizure of approximately 193 grams of cocaine, and approximately 12 grams of ※purple heroin§ which is a combination of heroin and fentanyl. In addition, over $2,600 in Canadian currency was seized. The total seizure is over $26,000.

28-year-old Jonathan Kerr of Etobicoke Ontario is charged with the following:
?Possession of a Schedule I Substance 每 Cocaine 每 for the purpose of Trafficking
?Possession of a Schedule I Substance 每 Heroin/Fentanyl 每 for the purpose of Trafficking
?Possession of Property Obtained by Crime Under $5000
?Fail to Comply with Probation

The accused was held for bail and will appear via video today at the Courthouse in Newmarket.


https://muskoka411.com/start/bracebridge-opp-take-26000-in-drugs-and-cash-off-the-streets/
RCO





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PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2018 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

( this one is even more bizarre , how did criminals from Toronto , end up in a tiny first nation reserve in Nipigon Ontario ? how many km's north of Toronto would that be .

something just doesn't seem right , why would they just decide to go there to sell drugs all of a sudden ? )





Search warrant leads to seizure of drugs and cash


Three people are in custody following a drug bust on Tuesday.
54 shares
Dec 13, 2018 10:04 AM by: TbNewsWatch.com Staff

Arrested
File photo


NIPIGON, Ont. 每 Ontario Provincial Police have three people in custody on drug-related offences following an execution of a search warrant.

OPP, in a release issued Wednesday, say a search warrant was executed Tuesday at a residence in Lake Helen First Nation.

As a result of the search, police seized a quantity of suspected crack cocaine, digital scales, cash and firearms.



Police arrested and charged Tristian Sault, 50, of Lake Helen First Nation, Matthew McCarthy, 29, of North York and Jelaine Benitez, 20, of Toronto.

All three accused have been remanded into custody pending a future bail hearing.



https://www.tbnewswatch.com/local-news/search-warrant-leads-to-seizure-of-drugs-and-cash-1158375
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2018 11:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is the big picture ... seen in a more North American scale.

================================================
Opioid Crisis Leaves 700,000 Americans Dead: "Epidemic Continues To Worsen And Evolve"
by Tyler Durden
Sat, 12/29/2018 - 09:12

More than 700,000 Americans died from drug overdoses from 1999 to 2017, about 10% of them in 2017 alone, according to a new report published by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In total, there were a staggering 70,237 drug overdose deaths last year, which is more deaths than all US military fatal casualties of the Vietnam War. Opioids were involved in 67.8%, or 47,600 of those deaths. Of those opioid-related overdose deaths, 59.8% of them, or 28,466, were due to synthetic opioids.

The report, which was published online in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), also examined drug overdose deaths from 2013-17. During that time, "drug overdose death rates increased in 35 of 50 states and DC, and significant increases in death rates involving synthetic opioids occurred in 15 of 20 states," the report said adding that the rapid increase was driven by fentanyl.

Of the 35 districts reporting data, 23 states and DC noticed increased rates of death directly linked to synthetic opioids. Fentanyl overdose deaths surged 150% from 2016 to 2017.

In prior reports, synthetic opioid-related deaths primarily occurred east of the Mississippi River. The latest CDC data now shows 8 states west of the Mississippi had significant increases in such deaths: Arizona, California, Colorado, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon, Texas, and Washington.

The CDC said overdoses were seen in both men and women, as well as non-Hispanic blacks, non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics, blacks, had the largest relative change, which was 25.2%. The most significant increase in deaths occurred among 25 to 44-year-old men, a sobering reality that demonstrates America's prime working age men are deteriorating.

"Through 2017, the drug overdose epidemic continues to worsen and evolve, and the involvement of many types of drugs (e.g., opioids, cocaine, and methamphetamine) underscores the urgency to obtain more timely and local data to inform public health and public safety action," the report said.

From 2013-2017, the largest increase in drug overdose death rates involved synthetic #opioids (other than methadone) - likely fueled by illicitly manufactured #fentanyl. Read more @CDCMMWR: https://t.co/l3uXaje3vw pic.twitter.com/wFwBGuRhgC

〞 Dr. Robert R. Redfield (@CDCDirector) December 21, 2018
In a separate, but relevant report, Altarum, an Ann Arbor, Michigan-based health care research and consulting firm said the opioid epidemic*s economic toll is disastrous. The report said, "the societal benefit of eliminating opioid overdoses, death and use disorders reached $115 billion in 2017, up from $95.3 billion for 2016."

The total exceeds $1 trillion when the costs from 2001 to 2017 are compiled. Another $500 billion is expected to be added to this sum by 2020. Lost earnings and waning productivity account for much of these costs and also result in declining tax dollars collected. [....]
https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-12-29/opioid-crisis-epidemic-continues-worsen-and-evolve-700000-americans-dead
================================================
RCO





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PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( there has been a lot of controversy in Barrie over the idea of an injection site downtown .
one of the main worries is it would need at least a 4 block drug law amnesty , meaning much of the downtown would become a sort of hard drug safe haven where the police were expected to not charge people with drug offences )


OPIOID CRISIS, PART 4: MP worries 'catastrophe' will follow if Bradford St. site is selected


Facility would require unofficial four-block amnesty zone where local police wouldn't enforce the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act: Nuttall

about 2 hours ago by: Raymond Bowe
Updated about 2 hours ago


A proposed safe injection site in downtown Barrie could be located at 21 Bradford St. Raymond Bowe/BarrieToday


One of the sites that has been identified to potentially house a safe injection/consumption site is 21 Bradford St., which is the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) services building in downtown Barrie.

Matt Turner, harm reduction co-ordinator with the Gilbert Centre, the lead agency in an application to bring a Consumption and Treatment Services (CTS) facility to Barrie, says the Bradford Street location is only one of the places being looked at in the downtown core.

The Gilbert Centre expects to submit its application to the province early this year, Turner said.

The CTS model, which the PC government says will include "wrap-around care" and improved access to treatment, replaces the former overdose prevention site (OPS) model under the previous Liberal government. The Gilbert Centre applied for an OP in April 2018, but a decision was never made before the change in provincial governments.

Under the former OPS model, the facility could have been something as austere as a trailer, but what the new CTS approach could include remains to be seen.

Whatever form it takes, Barrie-Springwater-Oro-Medonte (BSOM) MP Alex Nuttall says several aspects of a proposed injection site worry him.

In order for such a facility (which he refers to as an ※illegal-drug injection site§) to run properly, Nuttall says it would require an unofficial four-block amnesty zone where local police officers would not enforce the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA).

※This means needles on the street and a higher risk of major crimes in the area,§ Nuttall said in his 49-page report on the opioid crisis, which was released in late-November.

The federal government is responsible for granting exemptions to the CDSA for the area around injection sites.

Nuttall said he supports prevention and education programs in hopes of addressing the problem and, furthermore, treatment centres, but says he doesn*t support a place where someone can go shoot heroin.


※Catastrophe follows it,§ he said.

Referencing a mailer sent to BSOM constituents, recently elected downtown city councillor Keenan Aylwin says Nuttall is being "dishonest" in the picture he's painting around the local opioid crisis, while adding "this rhetoric is dangerous."

"What I saw in my mailbox today has convinced me that I have to speak up and call out dishonest behaviour when I see it," Aylwin wrote in a Facebook post on Friday. "This goes too far. The Member of Parliament for Barrie-Springwater-Oro-Medonte has put out a taxpayer-funded letter about the opioid crisis that is misleading, inaccurate and that plays up fear to divide us and distract us."

Aylwin added: "Let*s be clear about what he is doing 每 he is using the lives of the some of the most vulnerable in our community to score political points. This is disgusting, it*s dishonest and it*s below him."

The area around Dunlop and Bradford streets already has a large homeless population due to the number of social services there, as well as the added community stress of former prisoners from Central North Correctional Centre in Penetanguishene being dropped off at the downtown bus terminal, Nuttall said.

※To add a safe injection site so nearby would create a magnet for out-of-town drugs users, and would overrun the downtown with drug users and the drug paraphernalia that accompanies them,§ Nuttall wrote in his report.

City officials are looking at relocating the bus terminal to the lakeshore GO station to create a so-called transit hub.

Prior to publishing his opioid report, the MP visited injection sites in Vancouver and Toronto to see first-hand how they operate and their effect on the neighbourhood. Nuttall said injection sites create a ※virtual dead zone for economic growth."

A multi-million-dollar project by Waterloo-based HIP Developments is moving forward along Bradford Street, the YMCA is looking into building a new facility near Simcoe and Dunlop streets, and the city is working toward a complete renewal of W.A. Fisher Auditorium at the former Barrie Central Collegiate site on Dunlop Street West.


Turner says he understands some of the worries around the proposed Bradford Street location.

※The concerns are valid, however there is support from the YMCA and other agencies close by,§ said Turner.

When the application was submitted under the old OPS model, City of Barrie CAO Michael Prowse also raised some concerns about 21 Bradford St., in a letter to the ministry. Chief among them was the lack of local consultation.

※The challenge is you don*t have a chance to adequately address it in a closed process,§ Prowse said in a sit-down interview with BarrieToday. ※When you have a much more public process, you get the opportunity from stakeholders, potentially neighbours or residents in the area who may want some say in the application, so informing them and advising them is critical.

※We have not been given that opportunity," he added.

Although the power structure has changed in provincial government, not to mention a new city council, Prowse said he has still not heard much back from the province in the issue of a safe injection/consumption site in Barrie.

Barrie Mayor Jeff Lehman said he sees the benefits of a safe injection/consumption site, especially short term.

※I think the issue is down to this: Do we want people overdosing in restaurant bathrooms and alleyways, or in a site supervised by medical personnel? If the concern is the impact on surrounding land uses, then I think we need to consider what*s happening today,§ Lehman told BarrieToday.

※Unfortunately, I have heard complaints of public, or semi-public, drug use in this area of the city," the mayor added. "So, which is better or worse?§

Drug use and homelessness also go hand in hand. But as the drug problem swells, access to emergency shelter is always a concern, particularly during the winter months.

While the City of Barrie is making strides in its affordable housing strategy, some of the highest rental rates in the country can be found here.

In a recent presentation to city council, David Busby Centre executive director Sara Peddle said a local homeless count in April found 305 people in Barrie experiencing homelessness.

The centre recently opened a new facility on Mulcaster Street which will operate around the clock to help the city's marginalized population.


https://www.barrietoday.com/local-news/opioid-crisis-part-4-mp-worries-catastrophe-will-follow-if-bradford-st-site-is-selected-1156417
Bugs





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PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Go to:
Evidence
One high-quality cohort study examined overdose mortality before and after an SIS opened in Vancouver, BC.1
-Of persons living within 500 m of the SIS (70% of SIS users), overdose deaths decreased from 253 to 165 per 100 000 PYs and the absolute risk difference was 88 deaths per 100 000 PYs; 1 overdose death was prevented annually for every 1137 users.
-There was no change in mortality in the rest of city.
Before the SIS opened, 35% of 598 intravenous drug users were admitted to hospital in a 3-year period,2 15% for skin infections.
-After the SIS opened, of 1083 SIS users over 4 years,3 9% were admitted with cutaneous injection-related infections (including osteomyelitis and endocarditis).
-While SIS nurse ※referral§ to hospital increased the likelihood of admission, the average length of stay decreased by 8 days (from 12 to 4).3
-Indirect comparison of different cohorts is a limitation.
Near one SIS, average monthly ambulance calls with naloxone treatment for suspected opioid overdose decreased from 27 to 9 (relative risk reduction of 67%).4
About 6 to 57 HIV infections per year are prevented by the SIS according to mathematical modeling.5,6
-Limitations include assumptions made about drug use and injecting practices, and might include benefit from needle exchange programs.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5685449/


All of these stats mean less than they appear to mean. The Vancouver site's future existence -- which required a pass from the laws (however that happens. Maybe TC can tell us.) But these stats would determine future funding. It's a lot to ask.

But who knows how many junkies are in that district? How can they calculate these figures without knowing that? You'll notice that all their 'results' seem to be mathematically transferred into a number that is the rate per 100,000 PYs per 100,000. Do you know what a "PY" is? Me neither.

What does this statement mean? the absolute risk difference was 88 deaths per 100 000 PYs This is how they use numbers to confuse.

Quote:
... Colin Mangham, the director of research for the Drug Prevention Network of Canada, [wrote] in the online-only Journal of Global Drug Policy and Practice (JGDPP), which is said to be "posing as open-access, peer-reviewed scientific journal"[26][38][39] In the article Mangham claims that "the published evaluations and especially reports in the popular media overstate findings, downplay or ignore negative findings, report meaningless findings and overall, give an impression the facility is successful, when in fact the research clearly shows a lack of program impact and success."https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insite


You can't do anything for a junky. They are adept liars and swindlers. They are so bad that methadone clinics make their clients drink the potion on the spot for fear that they will take the drug and sell it.

They have to get so sick of the junkie lifestyle that they hate it enough to give it up. Even then, it takes tens of $thousands to get them dried out and flying right, and even then, it has a very low success rate. Like 5-10%.

This is a really bad idea. Where do junkies get the money to carry their habit? Look for the price of street sex to drop ... and for petty robberies to increase. It's the pattern.
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
You'll notice that all their 'results' seem to be mathematically transferred into a number that is the rate per 100,000 PYs per 100,000. Do you know what a "PY" is? Me neither.

Person Years (PY)
Quote:

What does this statement mean? the absolute risk difference was 88 deaths per 100 000 PYs This is how they use numbers to confuse.

There is nothing to be confused about. Just because you cannot follow doesnt mean the avg person can't.

Quote:

You can't do anything for a junky. They are adept liars and swindlers.

Sure you can. Its done all the time with success, but of course any number or % of success will be denied by you for the purpose of continuing your naivate.
Quote:
They are so bad that methadone clinics make their clients drink the potion on the spot for fear that they will take the drug and sell it.

LOL!
Plenty of people consume methadone off site, depends on the person and stage of care they are at.
Quote:

They have to get so sick of the junkie lifestyle that they hate it enough to give it up.

Finally a bit of truth! Congrats.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2019 2:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If TC has reliable stats on the outcomes of opioid rehab, he should produce them.

As for the stats we have been given, what is a "person year"? Why isn't it simply a percentage of the people in the group? 88 out of 100,000 addicts? Trust me, the general picture thoughout the recent past is more and more junkies dying in Vancouver, on Hastings ... it may be entirely due to the increased potency of the Chinese drugs we are importing.

They aren't reporting on their own patients with these stats. The chief improvement in the clients seems to be fewer infections from sharing needles, probably the very best way to get AIDS or other blood diseases.

I am sceptical because of what I have witnessed. I know a few 'recovering addicts' and their recovery looks to me like they still do the drug, they just don't do it all the time.
RCO





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

( more criminals from Toronto up north selling drugs , this time a bunch of 18 year olds from Scarborough selling cocaine in North Bay , exactly how or why they ended up in North Bay not sure )

Police release more information on recent drug bust


Police have released names of six individuals arrested during Tuesday's Bloem Street drug bust

about 3 hours ago by: BayToday Staff

drug bust 1 2016


The North Bay Police have released more information relating to the Bloem Street drug bust which took place early on Tuesday morning.

That morning North Bay Police Street Crime Unit and the Emergency Response Team conducted a search warrant.

As part of the investigation six individuals have been arrested at the scene of the warrant and are currently in custody in regards to drug related offences.

A quantity of illicit drugs, Canadian currency and a prohibited weapon have been seized.

The following items were seized at the location of the search warrant;
?123 grams of cocaine,
?11 grams of crystal methamphetamine,
?28 morphine pills,
?13 Percocet pills,
?3 suboxone pills and
?$2400 in Canadian Currency.

The street value of the drugs seized is $18,833.

As a result of the investigation police had arrested six individuals at the location. Investigators have charged;


Advertisement


Ashley Dufresne, a 36 year old female of North Bay, with;
?One count of Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking in cocaine;
?One count of Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking in crystal methamphetamine;
?One count of Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking in morphine;
?One count of Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking in Percocet; and
?One count of Possession of a Schedule I Substance (Suboxone).

Tayshaun Kolevski, an 18 year old man from Scarborough, with;
?One count of Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking in cocaine;
?One count of Possession of a Prohibited Weapon;
?One count of Fail to Comply with Recognizance; and
?One count of Possession of Property Obtained by Crime

Vincent Reid, an 18 year old man from Scarborough, with;
?One count of Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking in cocaine;
?Three counts of Fail to Comply with Recognizance; and
?One count of Possession of Property Obtained by Crime

Naveen Lotfi, an 18 year old man from Scarborough, with;
?One count of Possession for the Purpose of Trafficking in cocaine;
?One count of Possession of Prohibited Weapon; and
?One count of Possession of Property Obtained by Crime.

All four individuals charged were held in custody pending a bail hearing at the North Bay Courthouse. The two other individuals that had been arrested were released unconditionally.

https://www.baytoday.ca/local-news/police-release-more-information-on-recent-drug-bust-1190438
Toronto Centre





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
If TC has reliable stats on the outcomes of opioid rehab, he should produce them.

"Clinical data demonstrates that the biochemical approach to addiction provides a much higher (75-80%) recovery rate after 5 years 每 as opposed to the traditional 12-step or counselling-only approach without biochemical support, which has a much lower (15-25%) recovery rate after 5 years."
https://canadianhealthrecoverycentre.ca/why-chrc/alcohol-drug-addiction-success-rate/
thats one. Want others?
Quote:

As for the stats we have been given, what is a "person year"? Why isn't it simply a percentage of the people in the group? 88 out of 100,000 addicts?

Because it is a better stat than what we used to use.

I'll let this explain it to you.
"Incidence rate
The incidence rate is the number of new cases per population at risk in a given time period.[2] When the denominator is the sum of the person-time of the at risk population, it is also known as the incidence density rate or person-time incidence rate.[3] In the same example as above, the incidence rate is 14 cases per 1000 person-years, because the incidence proportion (28 per 1,000) is divided by the number of years (two). Using person-time rather than just time handles situations where the amount of observation time differs between people, or when the population at risk varies with time.[4] Use of this measure implies the assumption that the incidence rate is constant over different periods of time, such that for an incidence rate of 14 per 1000 persons-years, 14 cases would be expected for 1000 persons observed for 1 year or 50 persons observed for 20 years.[5]

When this assumption is substantially violated, such as in describing survival after diagnosis of metastatic cancer, it may be more useful to present incidence data in a plot of cumulative incidence, over time, taking into account loss to follow-up, using a Kaplan-Meier Plot.

Consider the following example. Say you are looking at a sample population of 225 people, and want to determine the incidence rate of developing HIV over a 10-year period:

At the beginning of the study (t=0) you find 25 cases of existing HIV. These people are not counted as they cannot develop HIV a second time.
A follow-up at 5 years (t=5 years) finds 20 new cases of HIV.
A second follow-up at the end of the study (t=10 years) finds 30 new cases.
If you were to measure prevalence you would simply take the total number of cases (25 + 20 + 30 = 75) and divide by your sample population (225). So prevalence would be 75/225 = 0.33 or 33% (by the end of the study). This tells you how widespread HIV is in your sample population, but little about the actual risk of developing HIV for any person over a coming year.

To measure incidence you must take into account how many years each person contributed to the study, and when they developed HIV. When it is not known exactly when a person develops the disease in question, epidemiologists frequently use the actuarial method, and assume it was developed at a half-way point between follow-ups. In this calculation:

At 5 yrs you found 20 new cases, so you assume they developed HIV at 2.5 years, thus contributing (20 * 2.5) =50 person-years of disease-free life.
At 10 years you found 30 new cases. These people did not have HIV at 5 years, but did at 10, so you assume they were infected at 7.5 years, thus contributing (30 * 7.5)= 225 person-years of disease-free life. That is a total of (225 + 50)= 275 person years so far.
You also want to account for the 150 people who never had or developed HIV over the 10-year period, (150 * 10) contributing 1500 person-years of disease-free life.
That is a total of (1500 + 275) = 1775 person-years of life. Now take the 50 new cases of HIV, and divide by 1775 to get 0.028, or 28 cases of HIV per 1000 population, per year. In other words, if you were to follow 1000 people for one year, you would see 28 new cases of HIV.

This is a much more accurate measure of risk than prevalence.

Quote:



I am sceptical because of what I have witnessed. I know a few 'recovering addicts' and their recovery looks to me like they still do the drug, they just don't do it all the time.


That statement is flat out lie Trum...er bugs.
Bugs





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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IF I am a liar, you are a cocksucker.

You have some nerve. My brother's son killed himself only six months ago as a result of an overdose, after a long course of treatment -- repeated treatments costing tens of $thousands each time. My brother even moved to a different community to keep him clean, but these zombies are everywhere. The addict stole from all his family members, broke up my brother's marriage, etc. You have no idea the toll that one addict can take.

I moved to a small community 8 years ago, and I have seen the young men in the village ... and a large proportion of them are addicted. I tried to find one of them as a helper to put a new roof on and couldn't get anyone to show up for work before noon because the methadone clinic didn't open until 10 am! They weren't any good anyway because they're moody shirkers, for the most part. You can see it. The drug affects brain chemistry, and even their physical movements. You can recognize them that way.

These are country-raised young men, and when you get a good one, it's a world of difference.

I was talking about opioid addiction, not 'addiction' in the broadest sense. You think some outfit (in effect) selling the idea of therapy is going to tell you the actual recidivism rate? Find an actual number if you can based on facts.

You can't even say what a "person year" means (if that's what it means) or why it would be used. You don't know what you're talking about.

Quote:
Treatment and Recovery
Can addiction be treated successfully?
Yes, addiction is a treatable disorder. Research on the science of addiction and the treatment of substance use disorders has led to the development of research-based methods that help people to stop using drugs and resume productive lives, also known as being in recovery.

Can addiction be cured?
Like other chronic diseases such as heart disease or asthma, treatment for drug addiction usually isn't a cure. But addiction can be managed successfully. Treatment enables people to counteract addiction's disruptive effects on their brain and behavior and regain control of their lives.

Brain scans comparing the brain of someone who stopped using month after 1 and 14 months of abstinence vs the brain of a healthy person. These images showing the density of dopamine transporters in the brain illustrate the brain's remarkable ability to recover, at least in part, after a long abstinence from drugs〞in this case, methamphetamine.51

Source: The Journal of Neuroscience, 21(23):9414-9418. 2001
Does relapse to drug use mean treatment has failed?
No. The chronic nature of addiction means that for some people relapse, or a return to drug use after an attempt to stop, can be part of the process, but newer treatments are designed to help with relapse prevention. Relapse rates for drug use are similar to rates for other chronic medical illnesses. If people stop following their medical treatment plan, they are likely to relapse.

Treatment of chronic diseases involves changing deeply rooted behaviors, and relapse doesn*t mean treatment has failed. When a person recovering from an addiction relapses, it indicates that the person needs to speak with their doctor to resume treatment, modify it, or try another treatment.52

This graph shows that relapse rates for substance use disorders is 40-60%, relapse rates for hypertension are 50-70%, and relapse rates for asthma are 50-70%.Source: JAMA, 284:1689-1695, 2000.
https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugs-brains-behavior-science-addiction/treatment-recovery


The figures that are elusive. This US government agency document, itself marketing therapy as a 'solution' to drug addiction, admits that relapses are to be expected. And they are expected, and not counted as a failure. The brother's son was considered a success in his repeated rehab plans. And they did work ... for a month or so.

As for you and me, there's no point in me responding to you if you dismiss what I say as lies. Fuck off.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bugs wrote:
IF I am a liar, you are a cocksucker.

LOL!
Quote:

You have some nerve. You have no idea the toll that one addict can take.

I do. Its not pretty.

I see I must have hit pretty close to home and upset you. Good. Perhaps you'll remember that in the future.
Quote:


I was talking about opioid addiction, not 'addiction' in the broadest sense. You think some outfit (in effect) selling the idea of therapy is going to tell you the actual recidivism rate? Find an actual number if you can based on facts.

Ahh the ol' move the goalposts trick. The numbers are there. That you cannot read them is not my problem.
Quote:

You can't even say what a "person year" means (if that's what it means) or why it would be used. You don't know what you're talking about.

LOL! I m guessing, once again you didnt read, for had you then you'd have seen the numbers and how it works.

It provides a better understanding of problem using PYs instead of % . Go back and read up on it. Its easy and in english.


Quote:

The figures that are elusive. This US government agency document, itself marketing therapy as a 'solution' to drug addiction, admits that relapses are to be expected. And they are expected, and not counted as a failure. The brother's son was considered a success in his repeated rehab plans. And they did work ... for a month or so.

No one in this thread has said relapses dont occur. No one has said success rate is X or Y or Z.

But one did say " You can't do anything for a junky. They are adept liars and swindlers."

So I countered that Yes you can do some stuff but recividism et al may and likely will occur.

Hell, you even admit your bro helped your nephew so ...so much for that idea.
Quote:

As for you and me, there's no point in me responding to you if you dismiss what I say as lies. Fuck off.


LOL!
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